Chrome almost supports SSO in Windows Kerberos environments

I was pleasantly surprised to find that Google Chrome has support for SSO and the Negotiate algorithm. Indeed it also has support for NTLM. So why the need for this post? I think the implementation could do with a little refinement.

Here’s my assumption. Credential delegation in a Kerberos environment is managed by the Kerberos system and its configuration, clients should not attempt to interfere with it. However, Google Chrome disallows ticket forwarding by default, effectively preventing delegation (constrained or otherwise). You can change this with an option on the command line but that means you have to know the option exists and have to plan to change it for every user of your web site. Seems the wrong way round to me. This default means that, out of the box, most web sites of any complexity will not operate as per their intended design.

Secondly, the default SPN behaviour is incorrect for Windows platforms. The Kerberos specification does not say much about SPNs, but they do at least have several parts: the service type, the host and port, and optionally an additional service identifier. Including the port is standard, but Chrome doesn’t do this by default. Secondly, the Chrome default behaviour is to resolve DNS CNAME records to A records and use this for the host part. I can’t fault Google for this approach but it does differ from the widely documented Windows approach of using SPNs for the host header (i.e. before CNAME resolution). (As an aside, note that if you take that approach then why shouldn’t you use the IPv4 address, or the IPv6 address, and what if the machine is multi-homed?). It also interferes with the ability of a host to provide multiple independent services because with the Google approach they all have identical SPNs. In Chrome’s defense, these options can also be controlled via the command line.

Finally, note that NTLMv2 is only available on Windows platforms. Chrome supports NTLMv1 on other platforms but that is horrendously insecure! This is not intended as a negative comment on Chrome, just something to be aware of.

It is great to see other browsers finally supporting SSO, Negotiate, NTLM and Kerberos. I just hope that interoperability is considered a desirable end goal. Without it these are just more competing proprietary solutions, and that would be a shame.

Material about Google Chrome was taken from here: HTTP authentication [The Chromium Projects]. See my recent post about Kerberos in Windows for links to supporting Windows implementation materials.

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s